A powerful “machine” has brainwashed society about aging. Government, media, and the pharmaceutical industry feed us disinformation to keep us upset and to boost their profits.

Now it’s time to fight back.

That’s the message of Marc Middleton – author and keynote speaker at the  Functional Aging Summit — in his provocative new book, “Growing Bolder: Defy the Cult of Youth, Live with Passion and Purpose.” The former TV journalist says it’s up to each of us to seize control of our health.

‘Defy the Cult of Youth’ – and More

The book is a great read that will inspire you and your older clients to slay the stereotypes and harmful myths about aging that have taken root in your mind.

The best and most consistent predictor of how long and how well you will live is your belief system about getting older. As Marc says, “What the mind believes, the body manifests.”

Pick up a copy on Amazon for yourself and get a few to share with others around you. They will thank you for it.

If you’re coming to the Functional Aging Summit, bring the book with you and ask Marc to sign it.

We might even give away some copies there.

Five Top Tips

Here are some key takeaways from the book to help you fight the machine and defy the cult of youth.

  1. Lifestyle trumps genes. People who are “very old” (around 100) and happy are active, don’t overeat and don’t smoke. “Everything we do today will influence the quality of life that we’ll lead in the future,” Middleton writes.
  2. Exercise is paramount — “the closest thing to an actual fountain of youth,” he says, calling physical movement “a basic biological need.”
  3. Most Americans don’t exercise and are overweight. Less than 17 percent over 65 are active enough. This leads to obesity, heart disease, diabetes and other health dangers.
  4. Exercise is better than medication. Too many would rather take prescriptions than work out – mainly because the “machine” tells them to pop a pill instead of get off the couch.
  5. The machine lies. One of the worst: “We’ll inevitably lose flexibility, muscle mass, bone density, and cardiovascular fitness as we age. Actually, in many cases, we can get faster, stronger and more flexible as we age. The deciding factor is regular vigorous exercise.”